Centreplate wire and sheave

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Centreplate wire and sheave

Postby Greybeard » Sat Feb 08, 2014 3:48 pm

Somewhere on these auspicious pages, I read about checking the centreplate wire for broken strands - 'sprags' as we calls 'em. I found plenty on the wire running rigging of the Humber Keel that I skippered!
I braved the gales this morning and climbed aboard for some more winter maintenance - yes, I know she was on the trailer, but I could still feel her moving :rolleyes:

Falcon's wire was feeling rough in parts, so had Bob kindly supplied a fresh one.
I began fitting it today, but found another bit of wear that is well worth looking out for - the brass sheave over which it runs before heading south to meet the plate had worn through almost to its bush. It had obviously given up the habit of turning a long time ago.

Image

Twenty minutes in the workshop on the trusty Boxford lathe soon had a shiny replacement one made - now bolted in place rather than riveted for ease of future greasing.

Image

Now, don't that look better? :) It's a hidden component that I'll be lubricating regularly from now on.

Steve

(I reckon this should have gone in the 'Other Technical' part of the forum. Can you move it for me, please, Dennis?)
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Postby Dennis » Sat Feb 08, 2014 4:16 pm

Greybeard wrote:(I reckon this should have gone in the 'Other Technical' part of the forum. Can you move it for me, please, Dennis?)


Easy peasy. :D
Cheers

Dennis

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Postby x-man12345 » Sat Feb 08, 2014 9:53 pm

Very neat indeed.
What about using Dyneema instead of the SS cable? Any thoughts. I think I read a shrimper article somewhere about it.
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Postby Greybeard » Sun Feb 09, 2014 10:09 am

Dyneema would be easier (and less painful) to replace than a worn wire. My only reservation would be that dyneema may fail without as much warning should it start to fray due to any damage. Wire tends to wear gradually and broken strands are easily spotted.
Dyneema might also be a little more vulnerable where it enters the plate. I'd certainly want to rig up some form of attachment that prevented it rubbing against any metal edges. I can't recall how much space there is above the plate in the casing to fit some form of shackle attachment.
I could well be wrong though as I have no real experience of using it, other than as a thin furling line on jib of the Drascombe. The propect of 100kg of steel making a sudden dash for freedom would keep me awake at night :o

I'll let someone else test it over a year or three before I start experimenting ;)

Steve
Steve (Treasurer) East Yorkshire
Ex-CC19 Falcon - Hull number 39 - 2003 that is now berthed in South Australia
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